Ezgo Wiring Diagrams Model 300 Late 1950’s


The EZGO company was born on June 13th, 1954 in a garage in Augusta Georgia. Two brothers, Billy and Beverly “Bev” Dolan, decided to make their own version of the increasingly popular golf cart built out of a military surplus 24-volt motor and a 36-volt battery stack. All of the golf carts produced by EZGO ran on batteries until 1971, after which a gasoline-powered option was added. Manuals for the early ’50s models are scarce and the technical info available on the web is hit-or-miss. The following diagrams are an effort to aid in restoring the classic EZGO in an easy to understand format. 

Operation

The manufacturer suggests operating the EZGO cart at top speed because it takes about the same amount of energy (if not a little less) to go in 3rd speed than to go in the first or second speed. The three different speeds are obtained by passing the current from the batteries through all or part of a resistor, the entire resistor for low-speed, half the resistor for the second speed, and bypassing the resistor completely for high-speed. This is accomplished by using three solenoids, one for each speed.
The forward-reverse switch is connected to another series of solenoids that passes the current to the motor through solenoids A and B for reverse, C and D for forward.

Turn the key to the right and current is passed through the black wire to solenoids C and D. When solenoid C has energized it connects Traction Motor Terminal S1 and A2. At the same time, solenoid D is energized closing a circuit between Traction Motor Terminal A1 (directed through solenoids 1,2, or 3 depending on what speed is selected) and the positive terminal of the battery. This is the same as bridging S1 and A2 together and placing A1 to the positive terminal and S2 to the negative terminal. The cart would then move forward.

The key turned left carries current through the white wire to solenoids A and B. When solenoid A is energized a circuit is closed between Traction Motor Terminal S1 and A1. At the same time, solenoid B closes a circuit between Traction Motor Terminal A2 (directed through solenoids 1,2, or 3 depending on what speed is selected) and the positive terminal of the battery. This would be the same as bridging S1 and A1 together and putting A2 on the positive terminal on the batteries and S2 on the negative terminal. The cart would then move in reverse.

EZGO Late 1950’s 16 Gauge Wiring Layout

Wire colors on the early EZGO were almost all black or white, and a green wire for first speed. This cart is a resistor type speed control with 7 solenoids.  “A” and “B” solenoids are reverse, “C” and “D” solenoids are Forward, and Solenoids 1,2, and 3 are speed controls.

EZGO Late 1950’s Heavy Cable Wiring Layout

Current Flow Logic Diagrams

First Speed

  • Key switch –  Forward
  • Speed Switch –  First Speed Contact
  • Solenoid “C” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “D” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “A” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “B” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “1” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “2” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “3” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Voltage across the full length of the Resistor 7

Second Speed

  • Key switch –  Forward
  • Speed Switch –  Second Speed Contact
  • Solenoid “C” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “D” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “A” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “B” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “1” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “2” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “3” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Voltage across half the length of the Resistor 7

Third Speed

  • Key switch –  Forward
  • Speed Switch –  Third Speed Contact
  • Solenoid “C” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “D” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “A” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “B” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “1” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “2” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “3” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals
  • Voltage bypasses Resistor 7

First Speed Reverse

  • Key switch –  Reverse
  • Speed Switch –  First Speed Contact
  • Solenoid “C” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “D” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “A” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “B” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals
  • Solenoid “1” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals
  • Solenoid “2” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “3” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Voltage across the full length of the Resistor 7

Second Speed Reverse

  • Key switch –  Reverse
  • Speed Switch –  Second Speed Contact
  • Solenoid “C” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “D” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “A” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “B” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “1” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “2” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals 
  • Solenoid “3” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Voltage across half the length of the Resistor 7

Third Speed Reverse

  • Key switch –  Reverse
  • Speed Switch –  Third Speed Contact
  • Solenoid “C” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “D” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “A” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals
  • Solenoid “B” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals
  • Solenoid “1” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “2” Open – Voltage not applied to small terminals
  • Solenoid “3” Closed – Voltage applied to small terminals, continuity across large terminals
  • Voltage bypasses Resistor 7

Wiring Key 1950’s Model 300 EZGO

  1. Charger Connection
  2. Speed Switch – 4 wires (Green, Black, White, Black) For Solenoids 1,2, and 3
  3. Key Switch – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C3, Black wire to Speed Switch Common, White wire to Solenoid Terminal A3
  4. Batteries – (6) 6-volt
  5. Traction Motor
    A1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal D4
    A2 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C1
    S1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal A4
    S2 – Black Wire to Battery Negative Terminal
  6. Solenoid – Single Action
    Solenoid A
    A1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal D4
    A2 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal B3, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C2
    A3 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal B2, Black wire to Key Switch R
    A4 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C4, Black wire to Traction Motor S1

    Solenoid B
    B1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal D1, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 3-4
    B2 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal A3
    B3 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal A2
    B4 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C1

    Solenoid C
    C1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal B4, Black wire to Traction Motor A2
    C2 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal D3
    C3 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal D2, Black wire to Key Switch F
    C4 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal A4

    Solenoid D
    D1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal B1
    D2 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C3
    D3 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 1-2, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal C2
    D4 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal A1, Black wire to Traction Motor A1

    Solenoid 1
    1-1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 2-4
    1-2 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 2-3, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal D3
    1-3 – Green wire to Speed Switch First Speed Contact
    1-4 – Black wire to Resistor 7

    Solenoid 2
    2-1 -Black wire to Middle Tap Resistor 7
    2-2 – White wire to Key Switch Second Speed Contact
    2-3 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 1-2, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 3-3
    2-4 – Black wire to Solenoid Termina 1-1, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 3-4

    Solenoid 3
    3-1 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 3-3, Black wire to Bypass contact on Resistor 7
    3-2 – Black wire to Speed Switch Third Speed Contact
    3-3 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 2-3, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 3-1
    4-4 – Black wire to Solenoid Terminal 2-4, Black wire to Solenoid Terminal B1
  7. Resistor

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